Geology & Geophysics Editors' Vox

Fall Meeting Recommendations from AGU’s Journal Editors, Part 1

AGU’s journal editors give their recommendations for some of the most interesting oral presentations, posters, tutorials, lectures, and special events coming up at this year’s Fall Meeting.

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The 2018 AGU Fall Meeting has a packed schedule with more than 26,000 oral and poster presentations, as well as many other events each day. Since it can be difficult to navigate such a large program of events, we asked the editors of AGU’s journals for their top picks.

The recommendations are grouped by topic. This list covers Interdisciplinary, Science and Society, Planetary Science, Space Physics and Space Weather, Seismology, and Tectonophysics. The subsequent list covers Oceans and Coasts, Cryosphere and Hydrology, Atmosphere and Climate, Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, and Biogeosciences.

Each recommendation includes the event code (with a link to the details in the full Fall Meeting 2018 program), day, time and room. Please support the poster sessions to encourage students and early career scientists.

Across Earth and Space Sciences

  • Planets as Experiments: Surface Processes in Extraterrestrial Environments – I think this is a great idea for a session. It’s basically saying: “We’ve figured out theories and models of surface processes based in large part on observations made on Earth, but now let’s apply them to other bodies in the Solar System and see if they’re general enough to still work”. It’s also about motivating more Earth scientists to become interested in planetary science, bringing their often more specialized knowledge to help us understand what we’re seeing on other planets, and hopefully demonstrating to them that they can learn a lot from the planetary results too. (Claire Newman, Associate Editor, JGR: Planets) – Session (EP13B), Monday, 13:40-15:40, Convention Center Room 147A; Posters (EP23F), Tuesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Can We Manage Earth’s Future? – Ensuring that the intellectual output of the geoscience community is put to effective use in a world dominated by political, economic, cultural and social factors will require forging new connections between the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. (Ariel Anbar, Biogeosciences Section President) – Union Session (U14A), Monday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center Room 202A
  • Deep Learning for Geoscience –Machine learning is now being used across the geosciences. Come to the session to find out about applications including remote sensing, earthquakes and climate patterns. (Chaopeng Shen, Associate Editor, Water Resources Research) – Session (IN14A), Monday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center Room 209A-C; Posters (IN21D), Tuesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Bright STaRS: Bright Students Training as Research Scientists – School children present their scientific studies in Earth, space and ocean sciences. Last year featured students as young as ten eagerly describing their science projects and field work. Please encourage the next generation of scientists and support this wonderful initiative by stopping by their posters. (AGU Publications staff) – Posters (ED41D), Thursday, 09.00-11.30, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Signatures of Climate Change in Surface Processes – This is a truly interdisciplinary session with presentations on a broad range of subjects all highlighting how climate change is affecting the Earth’s surface and processes. (Giovanni Coco, Editor, JGR: Earth Surface) – Session (EP52B), Friday, 10:20-12:20, Convention Center Room 147A; Posters (EP53F), Friday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • A Celebration of the Past and Discussion of the Future of Earth and Space Science – This is a session for everyone! There will be three 4-minute talks that highlight the science of AGU across the board in past, present and future. (Dork Sahagian, Associate Editor, JGR: Biogeosciences) – Centennial Plenary (U53C), Friday, 12:30-13:30, Convention Center Ballroom A-C
  • American Geophysical Union Literature Review – Several of AGU’s journal editors will give lightening presentations that highlight the hot topics and most noteworthy publications across Earth and space sciences in the past year. (AGU Publications staff) – Session (U53B), Friday, 13:40-15:40, Marriott Marquis Room Marquis 12-13 

Science and Society

  • The Value and Impact of Environmental and Human Health Indicators for Environmental Decision Makers – These posters at the crossroads of science and policy explore how indicators offer objective, scientific evidence for making sound policy decisions. (Dibyendu Sarkar, Associate Editor, GeoHealth) – Posters (GH11D), Monday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Integrating Socioeconomics and Governance into Studies of Food and Water Systems – This session highlights interdisciplinary research across different scientific disciplines and explores how the scientific and policy arena can be better connected. (Yoshihide Wada, Associate Editor, Water Resources Research) – Session (PA12B), Monday, 10:20-12:20, Marriott Marquis Room 1-2; Posters (PA13G), Monday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Toward a More Resilient Global Society – This session focuses on science approaches to the short-term societal impacts of floods, droughts, extreme weather, earthquakes, coastal inundation, and air and water quality. The content and format of this session makes it suitable for students, media and policy-makers. (Ben van der Pluijm, Editor-in-Chief, Earth’s Future) – Union Session (U21B), Tuesday, 08:00-10:00, Convention Center Room 202A
  • Geochemistry and Health: Involving Communities in Measuring Their Environment – Presenting projects based on community-based participatory research and citizen science, these presentations and posters illustrate how citizens can work hand-in-hand with scientists to create healthy environments. (Dibyendu Sarkar, Associate Editor, GeoHealth) – Session (GH32A), Wednesday, 10:20-12:20, Marriott Marquis Room Independence F-H; Posters (GH33C), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall

Planetary Science

  • Titan: Looking Backward, Looking Forward – This combines a very nice retrospective on what’s been discovered about Titan from Cassini-Huygens to date, and what may still be discovered from further mining that dataset, by making new observations (from telescopes and, hopefully, the Dragonfly mission back to Titan), and from continuing to carry out modeling and lab work. (Claire Newman, Associate Editor, JGR: Planets) – Posters (P21F), Tuesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (P34B), Wednesday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center Room 207A
  • A First Look at 162173 Ryugu and 101955 Bennu: Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx Arrive at Their Respective Target Asteroids – These sessions will provide a look at the first data returned from these asteroid sample-return missions. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session I (P21A), Tuesday, 08:00-10:00 and Session II (P22A), Tuesday, 10:20-12:20, both in Convention Center Room 207A; Posters (P33C), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • The Interiors of Jupiter and Saturn in the Era of Juno and Cassini – Insights into the interiors of the gas giants based on new data from Juno and all the data from Cassini’s 13 years at Saturn. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session (P23A), Tuesday, 13:40-15:40, Convention Center Room 207A; Posters (P43D), Thursday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Ceres and Vesta: Understanding the Protoplanets of the Asteroid Belt – Now that Dawn has ceased operations, these sessions will provide a look at what we have learned about the largest objects in the asteroid belt. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session (P24A), Tuesday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center 207B; Posters (P33D), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Cassini’s Legacy: Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Heliospheric Discovery – More Cassini! (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session (P32A), Wednesday, 10:20-12:20, Convention Center Room 207A; Posters (P43E), Thursday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Mars Planet-Encircling Dust Event of 2018 – The Mars community had been waiting for a planet-encircling dust storm for years, so when the storm began, the alert went fast through the whole community, and we got all of our instruments pointed to the planet straight away. This session (and there’s a special issue coming up later in our journal) is thus very interesting since the storm just happened and people have already processed their data and are doing great science with them! (Anni Määttänen, Associate Editor, JGR: Planets) The 2018 Mars global dust storm was the first in over five Mars years, but more importantly it was observed by a record number of instruments in orbit around and on the surface of Mars, including the first ground-based measurements of meteorological changes during a dust storm since the Viking Landers. This should be a great session exploring how observations and modeling combine to tell us about the origin, evolution, and decay of these events, which have such a huge impact on the Martian climate, global surface properties, and the near-surface environment crucial to landed assets and human exploration. (Claire Newman, Associate Editor, JGR: Planets) – Session (P34A), Wednesday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center Room 207B; Posters (P43J), Thursday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall

Space Physics and Space Weather

  • Global Dynamical Response of the Upper Atmosphere to External Forcing – This session and posters presents data from NASA Heliophysics missions including GOLD, launched in January, which is providing a new perspective on the space weather of the thermosphere and ionosphere as it takes data from a geostationary orbit with a high cadence. (Jens Oberheide, Associate Editor, JGR: Atmospheres) – Session (SA11A), Monday, 08:00-10:00, Convention Center Room 202B; Posters (SA13B), Monday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Quantitative Understanding of Particle Dynamics in Earth’s Radiation Belts – (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session I (SM11B), Monday, 08:00-10:00, and Session II, (SM13A), Monday, 13:40-15:40, both in Convention Center Room 204A-C; Posters (SM43D), Thursday, 13:40 18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Multiscale Investigations of Fundamental Plasma Processes by in Situ Observations and Simulations – These sessions will highlight multipoint measurements from MMS (which now has over 3 years of data under their collective belts) and MMS in conjunction with other missions. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Posters (SM13B), Monday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session II (SM32A), Wednesday, 10:20-12:20, Session III (SM33A), Wednesday, 13:40-15:40, Session IV (SM34A), Wednesday 16:00-18:00, all in Convention Center Room 201
  • Recent Advances in Understanding Energy-Dependent Dynamics of Radiation Belt Particles – (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session (SM21A), Tuesday, 08:00-10:00, Convention Center Room 204A-C; Posters (SM33B), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • The Role of Small-Scale Mechanisms in the Driving of Particle Energization and Loss in the Inner Magnetosphere and Radiation Belts – (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Session (SM22A), Tuesday, 10:20-12:20, Convention Center Room 201; Posters (SM33C), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Interactive Visualizations of Magnetic Reconnection: Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Observations and Simulations – I am interested to see what interactive visualization have been developed from MMS. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – eLightning session (SM31B), Wednesday, 08:00-10:00, Convention Center eLightning Theater I
  • Challenges in Extreme Space Weather Research: Science, Applications, and Policies for Rare Events – Space weather research is becoming increasingly important as society becomes more technologically dependent. These sessions will explore geophysical and societal impacts of rare yet extremely large space weather events. (Matthew Fillingim, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Posters (SM31C), Wednesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (SM51A), Friday, 08:00-10:00, Convention Center Room 201
  • Quantifying Uncertainty in Space Weather Modeling and Forecasting – (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Posters (SM31E), Wednesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (SM53A), Friday, 13:40-15:40, Convention Center Room 201
  • Machine Learning in Space Weather – (Jay Albert, Associate Editor, JGR: Space Physics) – Posters (SM31D), Wednesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (SM54A), Friday, 16:00-18:00, Convention Center Room 201

Seismology

  • Extracting Information from Geophysical and Geochemical Signals: Applying Machine Learning Through Data Science Challenges – Applications of machine learning to geophysical problems is an exciting new frontier that has seen significant expansion over the past year or so. These presentations will address how machine learning techniques can help address several foundational seismological problems. (Gavin Hayes, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters) – Posters (S11E), Monday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session I (S13B), Monday, 13:40-15:40 and Session II (S14A), Monday, 16:00-18:00, both in Marriott Marquis Room Independence D
  • Next-Generation Seismic Source Studies – This session highlights recent advances in earthquake source studies, one of the fundamental observations in seismology. (Gavin Hayes, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters) – Posters (S31F), Wednesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (S33B), Wednesday, 13:40-15:40, Marriott Marquis Room Independence E

Tectonophysics

  • Subduction Top to Bottom-2 – This series of sessions bring together a diverse set of subdisciplines in the geosciences, from terrestrial to marine, from recent to ancient, and highlight the current cutting edge in subduction zone research. (Kristin Morell, Associate Editor, JGR: Solid Earth) – Session I (T11C), Monday, 08:00-10:00, Session II (T12C), Monday, 10:20-12:20 and Session III (T13C), Monday, 13:40-15:40, all in Marriott Marquis Room Liberty L; Posters (T21F and T21G), Tuesday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • The Giants of Tectonophysics – This interesting session highlights how some of the big names in tectonophysics were able to make breakthrough contributions to this field, and an unique look into the evolution of tectonics and related work over the past century. (Gavin Hayes, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters) This unique session gives insights into truly groundbreaking discoveries and their discoverers. It should be interesting for a wide range of scientists. (Ylona van Dinther, Associate Editor, JGR: Solid Earth) – Union Session (U22A), Tuesday, 10:20-12:20, Convention Center Room 202A; Session (T24C), Tuesday, 16:00-18:00, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty N-P
  • Oceanic Lithosphere: Structure and Evolution from Creation to Destruction – A broad set of posters and talks that investigate oceanic crust and lithosphere across the ocean basins. (Gail Christeson, Associate Editor, JGR: Solid Earth) – Posters (T23E), Tuesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (T33B), Wednesday, 13:40-15:40, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty M
  • Interplay Between Seismic and Aseismic Slip: Implications for Fault Physics – An array of fascinating talks on the characteristics and physical mechanisms of seismic and aseismic slip. This hot and societally-relevant topic is addressed from a wide range of disciplines, including experimental, theoretical, observational and geological studies. (Ylona van Dinther, Associate Editor, JGR: Solid Earth) Slow earthquakes are at the frontier of earthquake seismology and tectonics. This year, this series of sessions and posters focuses on the interplay between seismic and aseismic process. (Satoshi Ide, Associate Editor, JGR: Solid Earth) – Posters (T33E and T33F), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session I (T41B), Thursday, 08:00-10:00, Session II (T42C), Thursday, 10:20-12:20 and Session III (T43B), Thursday, 13:40-15:40, all in Marriott Marquis Room Liberty N-P
  • Bridging Earthquakes and Earth Structure: Reconciling Deformation Observed over Geologic and Geodetic Timescales – (Nathan Niemi, Editor, Tectonics) – Posters (T33D), Wednesday, 13:40-18:00, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (T42B), Thursday, 10:20-12:20, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty I-K
  • Seafloor Geodesy: Measuring Deformation of the Seabed (Nathan Niemi, Editor, Tectonics) – Posters (T41F), Thursday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall; Session (T44C), Thursday, 16:00-18:00, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty N-P
  • The Nature of Creeping Faults: Where, Why, and How They Slip Slowly – This session brings together speakers from a variety of disciplines aiming to improve our understanding on why and how faults creep. Of particular note is the format of the session, focusing on short talks followed by discussion, allowing broader audience involvement. (Gavin Hayes, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters) (Nathan Niemi, Editor, Tectonics) – Session (T42D), Thursday, 10:20-12:20, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty M; Posters (T51J), Friday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall
  • Exploring Subduction Initiation Processes and Subduction Zone Dynamics: New Insights from Scientific Drilling, Marine Geophysics, and Ophiolites – (Nathan Niemi, Editor, Tectonics) – Session (T44A), Thursday, 16:00-18:00, Marriott Marquis Room Liberty L; Posters (T51E), Friday, 08:00-12:20, Convention Center Poster Hall

—Jenny Lunn, Director of Publications, American Geophysical Union; email: [email protected]

Citation: Lunn, J. (2018), Fall Meeting recommendations from AGU’s journal editors, part 1 , Eos, 99, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018EO110781. Published on 30 November 2018.
Text © 2018. The authors. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
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