Geology & Geophysics News

Smokey Bear, Fake Volcanoes, and Other Things We’re Reading

What Earth and space science stories are we recommending this week?

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Happy Birthday, Smokey! As summer camping trips end and fall fire seasons begin, it’s a good time to remember that only YOU (and I) can prevent wildfires.
Caryl-Sue, Managing Editor

 

Girl Scouts Emphasize STEM Education

Smiling young woman in a Girl Scouts sash speaks before Congress.
At a briefing on Capitol Hill, Sydne Jenkins, 16, spoke about the benefits and opportunities provided by Girl Scout STEM programs. Credit: Randy Showstack

Girls just wanna have space science badges! That’s how the song goes, right? I’m so excited that @girlscouts can (officially) be explorers, adventurers, investigators, researchers, and experts in space sciences!
Kimberly Cartier, Staff Writer

 

The Cows That Could Help Fight Climate Change. Through no fault of their own, cattle and other livestock contribute substantially to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions—14.5% by one prominent estimate!—mainly in the form of methane. This is an interesting read about a variety of ways researchers are looking to decrease cattle carbon emissions, including an effort to vaccinate the animals against methane-producing gut microbes. #CattleCounteringClimateChange (Of course, another route to the same end is for us omnivores—myself included—to cut back on our beef consumption.)
Timothy Oleson, Science Editor

 

An Italian Volcano Turned Out to Be a Fraud. “It might sound improbable that an impostor ended up sneaking into the volcanological equivalent of the Library of Alexandria.” Janine Krippner is one of the keepers of the Smithsonian Institution’s volcano registry, and this is the story about how she discovered a fake.
Heather Goss, Editor in Chief

 

The Most Boring Chemical Element (paywalled)

Periodic table of the elements
This is one of our favorite versions of the periodic table, illustrating each element’s natural occurrence or familiar human use. Click image for larger version. Credit: Keith Enevoldsen, CC BY-SA 4.0

What is the most boring element? This Nature Chemistry comment will keep you on your toes in its takedown of the periodic table.
Jenessa Duncombe, Staff Writer

 

Seeking Stardust in the Snow. Fallen stardust lets us relive “local” stars going supernova over the past 20 million years. I think we need a video of that!
Liz Castenson, Editorial and Production Coordinator

 

Is Grass-Fed Beef Really Better for the Planet? Here’s the Science. “For the environmentally minded carnivore, meat poses a culinary conundrum.” The article doesn’t provide all the answers, but it gave me—an omnivore and a self-confessed foodie—some information to chew on.
Faith Ishii, Production Manager

 

Expect a Busier-Than-Normal Hurricane Season, NOAA Says. Following one of the hottest Julys on record and flood-inducing rainstorms, the United States and other Atlantic nations now face an increased possibility of a highly active hurricane season. El Niño has dissipated, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration recently put out a revised forecast.
—Tshawna Byerly, Copy Editor

Citation: AGU (2019), Smokey Bear, fake volcanoes, and other things we’re reading, Eos, 100, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019EO131125. Published on 15 August 2019.
Text © 2019. AGU. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
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