Geology & Geophysics News

This Week: An Eos Summer Playlist

What are we listening to this summer?

By

 

Topping my summer playlist without a doubt is Rudy Willingham’s “Pool Party,” two and a half minutes of pure, funky joyousness featuring the cutest and catchiest vocal sample imaginable. I can almost guarantee it’ll have you instantly nodding, bobbing, and singing along, no matter whether you’re by yourself or standing 6 feet from others. If you need a reason to smile—or even if you’re already grinning from ear to ear—listen. to. this.
Timothy Oleson, Science Editor

 

One of my favorite musicians since I was a wee Suzuki student welcomes us to the summer season. (That’s Itzhak Perlman diving into the Summer III: Presto movement of Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.)
Caryl-Sue, Managing Editor

 

I typically have a few songs in heavy rotation for months before I move on to something new. Currently I’m wearing out “Trip 5” by Heavy Mellow and Melanie Faye, which is a calming (and somewhat meditative) instrumental track featuring some very talented guitarists.
Anaise Aristide, Production and Analytics Specialist

 

I’ve been really enjoying “If You’re over Me” by Years & Years, and I have just started enjoying again Hundreds of Lions by Erin McKeown.
Olivia V. Ambrogio, Manager, Sharing Science

 

 

Well, I think that This Pandemic Summer needs some pick-me-up songs, and no matter how down I feel about the state of *waves hands around frantically* all of this, Piano Guys never fails to make me smile. Here’s one for all of you, to remind you that there will be better times ahead.
Kimberly Cartier, Staff Writer

 

While a lot of folks are understandably seeking out spirit-raising bops right now, I’ve been looking for more meditative tunes. You’ve probably heard of Lord Huron, or you’ve at least heard them scoring TV shows and car commercials, but I hadn’t until they kept coming up on my streaming service. I couldn’t pinpoint why I immediately loved every song, but then I clicked through to buy their albums and read that the band is inspired by night drives through the foothills of Southern California—something I grew up doing—and realized it was massive bouts of nostalgia that hooked me. “When the Night Is Over” is my favorite at the moment, inspired by a “sci-fi version of L.A. noir.”
Heather Goss, Editor in Chief

 

Whenever I’m feeling down or unsettled, which, let’s be honest, happens more than usual these days, I like to turn to the amazing Janelle Monáe and her song “Electric Lady” (and that whole album). The funk, soul, and R&B magic that is this song just lifts you up, and you can’t help but bob along…or maybe even dance? I have!
Jenessa Duncombe, Staff Writer

 

I have also been listening to a lot of Alex Isley, specifically “We’ll Always Have Paris” from her album The Beauty of Everything, Pt. 2.
— Anaise Aristide, Production and Analytics Specialist

 

 

When I want to focus, I turn to this Spotify playlist curated by the user ChilledCow. It’s a collection of lo-fi beats to settle you into the zone. Although I don’t really know one song from the next, I’ll just recommend the first: “Snowman” by WYS. Better yet, start the playlist from the beginning and dive into that project you’ve been putting off.
Jenessa Duncombe, Staff Writer

 

I am listening to what I categorize as comfort-cataclysm music: Graceland, mostly because I am not going to Graceland this summer, or anywhere else, really, and a little bit of Prince (1999 seems so long ago, we need a 2020 song).
Naomi Lubick, International Editor

 

Then there’s the other end of the spectrum of L.A. bands. My friends and I, who were all in high school in the 1990s, lost our minds when Rage Against the Machine announced earlier this year they were going on tour again. Sadly, that probably won’t happen anytime soon, but please do enjoy the catharsis of the legendary, expletive-laden protest song “Killing in the Name” by screaming along to it in your living room.
Heather Goss, Editor in Chief

 

 

My country is handling the pandemic incredibly poorly right now, but I’m reminded that it’s okay to feel the smaller, more personal disappointments, too. This summer I was finally going to see Hamilton on stage for the first time, after years and years of waiting and saving for tickets. To no one’s surprise, the tour was canceled, but I still got to see it from my living room. I’ve had the soundtrack on repeat for a while now, but here’s my favorite song from the show—it’s also apropos, as so many of us are waiting for our fortunes to change.
Kimberly Cartier, Staff Writer

 

The Mountain Goats’s “This Year” was released in 2005, and for me, the song has felt relevant on many occasions since. But it’s not hard to find particular meaning in it—or at least in its iconic refrain—this year, of all years.
Timothy Oleson, Science Editor

 

Diana Ross and the Supremes remind us that, eventually, this too will end. Someday, we’ll be together.
Caryl-Sue, Managing Editor

Citation: AGU (2020), This week: An Eos summer playlist, Eos, 101, https://doi.org/10.1029/2020EO147174. Published on 17 July 2020.
Text © 2020. AGU. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
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