Geology & Geophysics Milestones

Honoring Earth and Space Scientists

AGU members and others in the news.

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Rita Colwell, distinguished university professor in microbiology at the University of Maryland in College Park, received the Vannevar Bush Award on 9 May “for her significant, life-saving contributions in the areas of global infectious diseases, water, and health.”

The Royal Society last month elected geophysicist Marcia McNutt, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, as a new Foreign Member of the society.

The society also elected six Earth scientists as Fellows of the Royal Society: Keith Beven, professor of hydrology at Lancaster Environment Center in Lancaster, UK; Roy Harrison, Queen Elizabeth II Birmingham Centenary Professor of Environmental Health, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK; Gabriele Hegerle, professor of climate system science, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, UK; Yadvinder Malhi, professor of ecosystem science, University of Oxford, UK; Andrew Orr-Ewing, professor of physical chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, UK; and Peter Smith, professor of soils and global change, The Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, UK. In all, on 5 May, the Royal Society elected 50 Fellows and 10 new Foreign Members from across the sciences.

Several Earth and space scientists were selected in May as new members of the National Academy of Sciences: David Charbonneau, professor in the Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.; Mary K. Firestone, professor and associate dean of instruction and student affairs, Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley; Nergis Mavalvala, Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics and associate head in the Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Gary Parker, professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana; Claudio Pellegrini, distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles; James T. Randerson, professor in the Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine; Karen C. Seto, professor in the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, Conn.; John E. Vidale, professor in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle; Paul O. Wennberg, R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; and James C. Zachos, professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Farouk El-Baz, director of the Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, was elected in March to the committee of the TWAS-Lenovo Science Prize.

Two scientists won the 2017 Vetlesen Prize in January for achievement in Earth sciences for untangling the complex forces that drive El Niño. The $250,000 award went to Mark A. Cane, G. Unger Vetlesen Professor Emeritus of Earth and Climate Sciences at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, N.Y., and S. George Philander, professor at Princeton University in Princeton, N.J.

Citation: AGU (2017), Honoring Earth and space scientists, Eos, 98, https://doi.org/10.1029/2017EO075343. Published on 05 June 2017.
© 2017. The authors. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0