Horses on Arctic snow
Horses trample snow at Pleistocene Park in Russia. Credit: Pleistocene Park

Reindeer Could Trample Permafrost Thaw. Herd animals could contribute to mitigation of climate change effects in the Arctic. By trampling and compressing snow, they help prevent permafrost thaw. Adorable ungulates to the rescue!
—Faith Ishii, Production Manager

What COVID-19 Looks Like from Above.

One of the many, many ways that COVID-19 has altered life on our planet is the sharp decline in emissions from travel and industrial sources. Satellites of the European Space Agency tracked the changes in nitrogen dioxide emissions over China through the peak of its coronavirus outbreak. As our own Jenessa Duncombe philosophized, “What we can see from above tells a story about what’s below.”

—Kimberly Cartier, Staff Writer

Sustainable Agriculture Reflected in Cuba’s Water Quality.

Scientists gather water quality measurements in central Cuba. Credit: Joshua Brown

Changing our actions—such as our agricultural practices—really does have an effect on the world we live in. Scientists have been able to show that water quality has measurably improved in Cuba, where farmers moved to small-scale, organic methods, greatly reducing nitrogen runoff from fertilizer into nearby rivers.

—Heather Goss, Editor in Chief

Do-It-Yourself Medical Devices and Protective Gear Fuel Battle Against COVID-19.

Not that we need to hear more about COVID-19, but I thought this was interesting for do-it-yourselfers.

—Melissa Tribur, Production Specialist

The Day the Coronavirus Came to Prison. A short letter from Sing Sing, and a long look at one of our most vulnerable populations.

—Caryl-Sue, Managing Editor

Citation:

(2020), This week: Adorable ungulates, sustainable agriculture, and COVID, Eos, 101, https://doi.org/10.1029/2020EO141957. Published on 27 March 2020.

Text © 2020. AGU. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
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