Geology & Geophysics GeoFIZZ

Can You Express Your Science in 17 Syllables?

Researchers are taking to Twitter to tell the world about their research through the lines of haiku. Now it’s your turn!

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Lines of lyrical lucidity and true confessions of experiments gone awry: what else would a scientific haiku contest bring?

Last week, the AGU Hydrology Section Student Subcommittee challenged scientists traveling to the Fall Meeting this December to explain their research in a single haiku. The format of a haiku—a poem split between three lines, with the first line having five syllables, the second seven, and the third five—dares poets to be brief, descriptive, and profound.

Since the competition was unveiled last week, submissions have been pouring in via the Twitter hashtag #HaikuYourResearch. The contest is still ongoing, and the competition is fierce. Think you have what it takes?

To inspire your inner poet, we grabbed a few haikus for your reading pleasure. So fix a cup of tea, and sit back and enjoy the sweet simplicity of scientific minimalism. Then, go write your own poem!
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But Soft, What Light Through Yonder Cloud Breaks?


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Rhyming “Mass Spectrometry” Is Impressive


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Nothing Survives the Robot Army


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You Do Matter, Manganese! Don’t Let Anyone Tell You Otherwise


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Can “Sounds of Dirt” Please Be a Band Name?


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#RealTalk


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Cute Mammals to the Rescue!


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We’re Glad Yellow Was Not Included…


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“Think About Direction; Wonder Why You Haven’t Before”*

*This link is for you, millennials!
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The Symphonies of Space


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Devonian-ly Puzzling


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I Guess You Could Say the Lasers See the Trees for the Forest?


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Ye, Plume of Old, Hark!


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It’s OK, We Like Talking to Rocks Too


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Of course, these are just a sliver of the competition’s entries—there are oh so many more haikus tagged with #HaikuYourResearch on Twitter. Retweet or like the poems that catch your fancy to weigh in on the competition!

And if the spirit moves you, tweet your own haiku tagged with #HaikuYourResearch to give your studies the 17-syllable spotlight!

—Jenessa Duncombe (@jenessaduncombe), News Writing and Production Intern

Citation: Duncombe, J. (2018), Can you express your science in 17 syllables?, Eos, 99, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018EO107847. Published on 16 October 2018.
Text © 2018. The authors. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
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